Moon River



Judy Garland, after the rainbow's end...


21 comments:

  1. With hairstyle courtesy of Dairy Queen.

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    1. As lovely as this performance is, I kept thinking "Dear Abby called, she'd like her hair back!"

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    2. even though she was a shiksa, judy did a marvelous hadassah flip.

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  2. What a beautiful way to round off a Sunday night... bliss. Jx

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    1. It's all for you, darling! xoxo

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    2. "Two drifters, off to see the world
      There's such a lot of world to see..."
      Jx

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  3. How was she able to get Salvador Dali to do her sets for her??

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  4. Perfection. Loved that moment at the end when she looked down, the complex emotions running over her face, the sense that she knew she'd nailed it.

    Odd though the set is, it works beautifully, referencing as it does the homespun values of a past that while valued, has been decontextualised and destabilised by modern life, and the life of this particular performer in particular. The shadow of Dorthy Gale is there in the antique clocks, the crook-piped stove and the spindle-back chairs, but as though assembled in a dream, cut off from reality, washed up on some prairie where the tornado deposited its contents. The harmonica, too, underlines this sense of a waiting-room at worlds end. I don't know who dreamed up the scenario, but it was a fantastic collaboration with JG, capturing the role that made her and then haunted her, and giving her the perfect setting in which to build the extraordinary, bitter-sweet yearning and desolation of her performance. I'm in awe.

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    1. When she finishes, she's like "There, are you happy now? That was another piece of my soul."

      "Moon River" is one of my favorite songs (along with another Mancini classic, "The Days of Wine and Roses") and Judy certainly did it justice here. More than that, she made it her own. She knew no other way.

      (As an aside, whenever I hear this song I can't help but think of Almodovar's Bad Education. For better or worse!)

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  5. I agree with everyone about how great Judy Garland sounds, but I hat harmonicas. They creep me out. Not even Ms Garland can save them. Stop harmonicas now.

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    1. Harmonicas are indeed creepy...and all-too-American.

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  6. The set is producing negative Feng shui, causing melancholia in the Judy Person.

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  7. And this appeared on national television: this suffering, ill, transcendent woman, dressed up, propped up, and made to perform.

    Which she then proceeded to do, simply and straightforwardly, better than anyone else in the world could have at that moment.

    And now we have Kardashians and Honey Boo Boo. Sigh.

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  8. Tears of joy... and tears of sorrow as I doubt we won't hear such beauty anymore.

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  9. Very disturbing set design. Judy did a wonderful job, and managed to give the audience a poignant, pained smile at the end. The hairdo reminded me of Ann Landers, also Dale Evans, Ann Miller, et al. Fortunately for us, Judy changed her hairstyles often enough to avoid being trapped in a hair time-warp, which is more than can be said for Mlles. Landers, Evans & Miller.

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